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Racial profiling : our opinion | CDPDJ

Racial profiling

Racial profiling

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In 2003, the Commission began receiving complaints about racial profiling. The Commission was among the first institution in Québec to reflect upon and raise awareness about racial profiling as a form of discrimination. In 2005, the Commission adopted a definition of racial profiling, which has since been recognized by the courts and by the Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM). In 2009, it launched a public consultation throughout Québec on racial profiling and racialized youth between the ages of 14 and 25. This consultation led to the publication of a major report containing more than 90 recommendations, as well as the Commission’s undertakings for future action in this area. Since then, the Commission has ensured an effective follow-up so that the recommendations are implemented. It also continues do to work towards better social, political and legal recognition of racial profiling and its consequences.

English language translations are provided when available.

  • Bertrand c. Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse (2014) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window. (in French only)
    The Québec Court of Appeal upholds the Human Rights Tribunal’s ruling in the case of the Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse v. Bertrand (2013) which found that four Black men were victims of racial profiling in a Terrebonne bar but that the moral damages of $12,000 should be paid only by the business and not its owner, Claude Bertrand.

  • Ville de Longueuil c. Joël Debellefeuille (2012) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window. (in French only)
    A black man was pulled over as he was driving his BMW, and accused of refusing to provide information or ID as requested by the police. The Municipal Court was of the opinion that no valid reason to suspect him of car theft had ever been established by the police, and that, on the contrary, the evidence established that racial profiling was the main reason why he was pulled over. He was acquitted.

  • CDPDJ (Milad Rezko) c. Ville de Montréal (SPVM) et Dominique Chartrand (2012) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window.
    A Montréal police officer detained an Arab man for nearly one hour without valid reason, in addition to calling all Arabs “liars”. The police officer and the City of Montréal were ordered to pay $18,000 to the complainant.

  • Montréal (Ville de) c. Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse (2011) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window. (in French only)
    Having chosen not to challenge a ticket, a young black man was found guilty of violating a municipal regulation and sentenced to pay a fine and costs. The Human Rights Tribunal, and subsequently the Superior Court and the Court of Appeal, concluded that the fact that F. F. had been convicted of an offence did not prevent a tribunal from rendering a decision on the discriminatory nature of the policy leading to his arrest, or of the actions taken during said arrest.

  • Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse c. Bombardier inc. (Bombardier Aerospace Training Center) (2010) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window.
    Bombardier refused to provide a Canadian airline pilot, a Muslim born in Pakistan, with the training necessary to fly a certain type of aircraft under his Canadian pilot’s licence. Bombardier claimed that it was required to comply with a decision of the U.S. authorities, who had denied him security clearance for his U.S. licence alleging he was a threat to aviation and to national security. The Human Rights Tribunal awarded the complainant $309,798 for lost income, in addition to $25,000 in moral damages and $50,000 in punitive damages, finding that the company discriminated against him based on his ethnic or national origin, Moreover, the Tribunal ordered Bombardier to cease applying US standards and decisions regarding “national security” when processing training requests for pilots who hold a Canadian licence.

  • R. c. Campbell (2005) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window.
    A young black man was stopped by Montréal police, and accused of drug possession and breach of conditions. The charges were withdrawn after the arrest was deemed illegal because the police had stopped the young man based on the colour of his skin.

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Did you know?

More than 21% of complaints before the Commission in 2015-2016 involved discrimination based on race, colour and ethnic or national origin, for a total of 152 complaints.

 

To learn more...

See our information pages on the grounds of discrimination: