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Service dogs and guide dogs: our opinion | CDPDJ

Service dogs and guide dogs

Service dogs and guide dogs

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The courts have recognized that service dogs and guide dogs as a means of palliating a handicap. The first court decision in Québec which upheld the prohibition of discriminating against persons who use a guide dog dates back to 1982.

English language translations are provided when available.

  • CDPDJ c. Côté (2015) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window.
    The Québec Court of Appeal found that the parents of an autistic child who use a service dog to palliate its disability are protected by the Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms and must have access to public places when accompanied by the dog, even in the absence of the child.

  • CDPDJ c. Bar La Divergence (1994) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window. (in French only)
    The owners of a disco-bar refused access to a blind person because she was accompanied by a guide dog. They were required to pay $3,000 to the victim.

  • CDPDJ c. Quillorama de l'Anse inc. et Roger Ouellet (1998) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window. (in French only)
    Quillorama de l'Anse inc. and its owner were ordered to pay $500 to a disabled customer to whom they had refused access because she was with a service dog.

  • CDPDJ (Sylvain Lemay) c. Coopérative de taxis de Montréal (2008) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window. (in French only)
    A taxi driver and a taxi company were ordered to pay $5,000 to a disabled man for refusing to transport him because he was accompanied by a service dog. The taxi company also had to establish a non-discrimination policy, particularly on the basis of handicap.

  • CDPDJ (Michel Larochelle) c. Montuori Holdings Corporation et Pellegrino Montuori (2008) This link will redirect you to an external Website in a new window. (in French only)
    A waiter refused to serve a disabled man accompanied by his service dog because he was allergic to dogs. The waiter and Montuori Holdings Corporation were ordered to pay $4,000 to the complainant.

 

Did you know?

The courts have established that disabled people can choose the means of their choice to compensate their disability, whether a service dog, a wheelchair or both means.

 

To learn more

See our information page on the ground of discrimination: